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History of Caldwell County, Missouri
As written in the 1876 Atlas of Caldwell County Missouri

The Rebellion

When, in 1861, the rebels opened hostilities, by firing on Fort Sumter, the people of our County were pretty evenly divided on the question of going out or remaining in the Union. But the Union men, perceiving the danger of indecision, acted with promptness and energy, and gained a great advantage over their opponents at the start. The l.loyalty of the doubtful and wavering was assured and confirmed.

The First company of Home Guards, outside of St. Louis, was organized at Mirable, by Captain E.D. Johnson, a few days after the bombardment of Fort Sumter. It was armed with shot-guns and such other weapons as were at hand. Although far from supports, they bravely held their own, and soon had the pleasure of seeing the Secessionists flee to the south part of the State.

Amongst those who took a conspicuous stand for the old flag, were Daniel Proctor, Moses L. James, E.D. Johnson, Geo. Smith, W.S. Pollard, William Plumb, Elias Lankford, John F. Dodge, S.W. Lankford, G.W. Noblitt, G.W. Murphy, John T. Ross, Lemuel Dunn, Jacob Snyder, J.H. Williams, M.R. Streeter, W.H. Crawford and others; whilst Chas. J. Hughes, Wilbur F. Boggs, David Thompson, Doctor Bassett, T.N.O. Butts and John Myers were amongst the most conspicuous of those who urged our people to follow the fortunes of Gov. Jackson into the Confederacy.

In the summer of 1861, two companies of rebels, under the command of David Thompson and George W. Withers, organized at Kingston, and went south to join the forces under the command of General Price.

Space will not allow a detailed history of the many citizens who won brilliant reputations for gallantry and courage on hard-fought fields, and it must suffice to say that whether they fought as Federals or Confederates, the soldiers of Caldwell were distinguished by their valor, endurance and humanity.

No battles were fought within our borders during the rebellion, and but one skirmish took place that resulted in the Spilling of blood. In the fall of 1861, a skirmish took place in Lincoln Township, between a body of militia and a band of bushwhackers, which resulted in the death of Captain S.M. Lankford, as brave a man and as true a patriot as ever donned a uniform.

Crosby Johnson, An Illustrated Historical Atlas of Caldwell County, Missouri.   1876.  Edwards Brothers

Territorial History
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Salem, Missouri
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The Rebellion
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All photos are copyright KingsCross Farm, 1997 & 1998
All written material other than reference material copyright KingsCross Farm 1998